My shop is in an over-sized two-car garage attached to my home. My work is a calling, in the theological sense of the word. Ethical and moral questions arise every day – they are hard, sharp, unambiguous and unavoidable.

So you think you want a custom cafe racer?

Posted: November 19th, 2012 | Author: Administrator | Filed under: Engine, Forks & Steering, Frame & Body, Fuel & Air, Ignition, Timing, & Electrical, Motorcycle Repair, Random Things of Interest, Wheels, Tires, & Brakes | Tags: | No Comments »

Greetings,

The following in the first installment of correspondence between me, a would-be cafe-racer builder, and one of his customers. The customer was so appalled at what was delivered to him that he forced the builder to bring the bike to me and pay me to put things right.

Caveat emptor!

Chris


John and Casey,

This is the first in a short series of illustrated reports on my findings and work on your bike.

It will be difficult reading for both of you – and it is difficult work and writing for me. I began work on your bike last evening and had to quit after 1 ½ hrs. as what I was finding was making me increasingly angry.

In short, this bike was built/assembled by a dangerously incompetent person who should never be allowed to work on a vintage motorcycle again – unless they are willing to apprentice for a couple of years with someone who knows what they are doing.

Report – Initial Inspection:

Compression test: L = 190 psi and R = 175 psi. on a cold engine.

Since the spec on a new engine is 175 psi., these numbers suggest a substantial build-up of carbon on the piston crown and head. I will put a bore scope down the spark plug hole today and have a look. Also I’ll do a leak-down test. For the price of this bike – $7k – it should have a freshly-built engine, not just a freshly-painted engine.

The electronic ignition module is located in the worst possible place on the bike – directly in front of the leading edge of the rear tire with no intervening fender or other shield to protect it from the grit/crud/spray hurled at it by the spinning rear wheel. I will relocate it or shield it.

The front brake is dragging badly – and it’s a simple drum brake – the adjustment of the cable/actuating mechanism is just too tight. Again, no excuse for this. A simple pre-delivery inspection would have caught this. No bike should leave a shop with compromised brakes.

All three Phillips head screws for the cover on the centrifugal oil filter had seized and the heads stripped out. The rust pattern in the stripped screw heads shows that no attempt was made to remove the stripped screws and replaced with good ones so that the new owner could access/clean the filter. Which suggests that the person who built this bike did not clean the filter either.

Working carefully, I was able to remove all three screws in about 30 minutes. The pix below show what I found and how I fixed it. They also show the inside of the centrifugal filter and what I found in there – the usual black sludge but with lots of small bits of metal embedded in it – steel as it sticks to the head of a magnet. This probably comes from the transmission gears and suggests that it has been treated badly at some point in its past.

First I drilled out the heads of the stripped screws a bit and then hammered a 3/8” drive torx bit into the hole. Anoint with penetrant, heat with MAPP gas, and attach impact driver to the torx bit. One good whack with a 3 lb. Short sledge and voila. Well, almost. The threads of the top/left screw were stuck so badly that I just twisted the head off the screw shank. Fortunately, I was able then to carefully lift the cover off and then get a grip in the bit of shank protruding from the case.

And finally, two of the four bolts holding the footpegs to the frame were badly cross-threaded and one on the right side had jammed half way in and been left like that, here’s the pic.

Not only does the shoddy/dangerous workmanship offend me, I am dumbfounded by the fact that the person who assembled this bike did not think or care that anyone would notice.

I am posting this series of correspondence on my website – minus your names – as a bit of a caution to folks buying a custom-built bike and to those who think that capitalizing on the cafe-racer fashion is an easy quick buck.

John, I am roughing up you and your biz – and it’s got to hurt. But it’s the truth. If you can’t stand it, refund C’s money in full and get out of the biz. Otherwise, do the harder/right thing and take it and learn from it.

Sincerely,

Chris Finlayson
Existential Motorcycles
Alexander, NC


John and Casey,

This is the first in a short series of illustrated reports on my findings and work on your bike.

It will be difficult reading for both of you – and it is difficult work and writing for me. I began work on your bike last evening and had to quit after 1 ½ hrs. as what I was finding was making me increasingly angry.

In short, this bike was built/assembled by a dangerously incompetent person who should never be allowed to work on a vintage motorcycle again – unless they are willing to apprentice for a couple of years with someone who knows what they are doing.

Report – Initial Inspection:

Compression test: L = 190 psi and R = 175 psi. on a cold engine.

Since the spec on a new engine is 175 psi., these numbers suggest a substantial build-up of carbon on the piston crown and head. I will put a bore scope down the spark plug hole today and have a look. Also I’ll do a leak-down test. For the price of this bike – $7k – it should have a freshly-built engine, not just a freshly-painted engine.

The electronic ignition module is located in the worst possible place on the bike – directly in front of the leading edge of the rear tire with no intervening fender or other shield to protect it from the grit/crud/spray hurled at it by the spinning rear wheel. I will relocate it or shield it.

The front brake is dragging badly – and it’s a simple drum brake – the adjustment of the cable/actuating mechanism is just too tight. Again, no excuse for this. A simple pre-delivery inspection would have caught this. No bike should leave a shop with compromised brakes.

All three Phillips head screws for the cover on the centrifugal oil filter had seized and the heads stripped out. The rust pattern in the stripped screw heads shows that no attempt was made to remove the stripped screws and replaced with good ones so that the new owner could access/clean the filter. Which suggests that the person who built this bike did not clean the filter either.

Working carefully, I was able to remove all three screws in about 30 minutes. The pix below show what I found and how I fixed it. They also show the inside of the centrifugal filter and what I found in there – the usual black sludge but with lots of small bits of metal embedded in it – steel as it sticks to the head of a magnet. This probably comes from the transmission gears and suggests that it has been treated badly at some point in its past.

First I drilled out the heads of the stripped screws a bit and then hammered a 3/8” drive torx bit into the hole. Anoint with penetrant, heat with MAPP gas, and attach impact driver to the torx bit. One good whack with a 3 lb. Short sledge and voila. Well, almost. The threads of the top/left screw were stuck so badly that I just twisted the head off the screw shank. Fortunately, I was able then to carefully lift the cover off and then get a grip in the bit of shank protruding from the case.

And finally, two of the four bolts holding the footpegs to the frame were badly cross-threaded and one on the right side had jammed half way in and been left like that, here’s the pic.

Not only does the shoddy/dangerous workmanship offend me, I am dumbfounded by the fact that the person who assembled this bike did not think or care that anyone would notice.

I am posting this series of correspondence on my website – minus your names – as a bit of a caution to folks buying a custom-built bike and to those who think that capitalizing on the cafe-racer fashion is an easy quick buck.

John, I am roughing up you and your biz – and it’s got to hurt. But it’s the truth. If you can’t stand it, refund C’s money in full and get out of the biz. Otherwise, do the harder/right thing and take it and learn from it.

Sincerely,

Chris Finlayson
Existential Motorcycles
Alexander, NC


John and Casey,

This is the first in a short series of illustrated reports on my findings and work on your bike.

It will be difficult reading for both of you – and it is difficult work and writing for me. I began work on your bike last evening and had to quit after 1 ½ hrs. as what I was finding was making me increasingly angry.

In short, this bike was built/assembled by a dangerously incompetent person who should never be allowed to work on a vintage motorcycle again – unless they are willing to apprentice for a couple of years with someone who knows what they are doing.

Report – Initial Inspection:

Compression test: L = 190 psi and R = 175 psi. on a cold engine.

Since the spec on a new engine is 175 psi., these numbers suggest a substantial build-up of carbon on the piston crown and head. I will put a bore scope down the spark plug hole today and have a look. Also I’ll do a leak-down test. For the price of this bike – $7k – it should have a freshly-built engine, not just a freshly-painted engine.

The electronic ignition module is located in the worst possible place on the bike – directly in front of the leading edge of the rear tire with no intervening fender or other shield to protect it from the grit/crud/spray hurled at it by the spinning rear wheel. I will relocate it or shield it.

The front brake is dragging badly – and it’s a simple drum brake – the adjustment of the cable/actuating mechanism is just too tight. Again, no excuse for this. A simple pre-delivery inspection would have caught this. No bike should leave a shop with compromised brakes.

All three Phillips head screws for the cover on the centrifugal oil filter had seized and the heads stripped out. The rust pattern in the stripped screw heads shows that no attempt was made to remove the stripped screws and replaced with good ones so that the new owner could access/clean the filter. Which suggests that the person who built this bike did not clean the filter either.

Working carefully, I was able to remove all three screws in about 30 minutes. The pix below show what I found and how I fixed it. They also show the inside of the centrifugal filter and what I found in there – the usual black sludge but with lots of small bits of metal embedded in it – steel as it sticks to the head of a magnet. This probably comes from the transmission gears and suggests that it has been treated badly at some point in its past.

First I drilled out the heads of the stripped screws a bit and then hammered a 3/8” drive torx bit into the hole. Anoint with penetrant, heat with MAPP gas, and attach impact driver to the torx bit. One good whack with a 3 lb. Short sledge and voila. Well, almost. The threads of the top/left screw were stuck so badly that I just twisted the head off the screw shank. Fortunately, I was able then to carefully lift the cover off and then get a grip in the bit of shank protruding from the case.

And finally, two of the four bolts holding the footpegs to the frame were badly cross-threaded and one on the right side had jammed half way in and been left like that, here’s the pic.

Not only does the shoddy/dangerous workmanship offend me, I am dumbfounded by the fact that the person who assembled this bike did not think or care that anyone would notice.

I am posting this series of correspondence on my website – minus your names – as a bit of a caution to folks buying a custom-built bike and to those who think that capitalizing on the cafe-racer fashion is an easy quick buck.

John, I am roughing up you and your biz – and it’s got to hurt. But it’s the truth. If you can’t stand it, refund C’s money in full and get out of the biz. Otherwise, do the harder/right thing and take it and learn from it.

Sincerely,

Chris Finlayson
Existential Motorcycles
Alexander, NC
Bad location for sensitive electronics